Stormwater Management Action Plan

Stormwater Action Plan needed to help capture the stormwater to improve the Health of Our Ventura River Watershed

We are running out of water.  Entering into the sixth year of drought has us looking for sources of new water.  Tying into the CA State Water project would provide us 5,000 AFY and would be costly and take time to build the pipes to transport the water.
We need to look for action we can take now.   Lowimpact development (LID) is a term used in Canada and the United States to describe a land planning and design approach to manage stormwater runoff.  LID emphasizes conservation of existing resources and use of on-site natural features to protect water quality. The best LID practices serve multiple functions, including  calming traffic, improving pedestrian and bicycle pathways, cooling and beautifying streets, cleaning and capturing stormwater runoff, and creating wildlife habitat.  This slow it, spread it and sink it approach to development is focused on using water as a resource and is more cost effective and beneficial for neighborhoods and communities.
 From Watershed Management Group-Tucson

Link to Stormwater Action Planning Process For Sierra Vista
https://watershedmg.org/sites/default/files/documents/sierra-vista-summary-stormwater-action-plan-dec-2015.pdf

Low Impact Development Strategies to slow, spread and sink rainwater that improves permeability, reduces runoff and helps to recharge ground water include: sidewalk stormwater planter, sidewalk stormwater tree trench, parking lot stormwater infiltration trench, curb cuts, pervious storm drains (not concrete) and catch basins, and permeable paving.

 1. City of Ojai Public Works Department set up examples:

City of Ojai has 31,680 ft of underground storm drains and 7,920 ft of open channel drains with hard side and hard bottoms.  These could be evaluated for their stormwater capture potential.

 2. City of Ojai-Complete Streets –Low Impact Development http://ojaicity.org/document-center/

From the Complete Streets document:

LU1.2.5. Reduce the proportion of street frontages and rights of way lined by parking lots, blank walls, or empty lots.

T1.1.1. In planning, designing, and constructing Complete Streets:
-Street trees shall be provided, correlated with the standards in the Community Forest Management Plan.
-Provide safety planters, street trees, landscaping, and planting strips, including native plants where possible, in order to buffer traffic noise and protect and shade pedestrians and bicyclists.
-Reduce surface water runoff by reducing the amount of impervious surfaces on the streets; and green street implementations that use green spaces to infiltrate surface runoff.

3. City adopted MWELO- Model Water Efficiency Landscape Ordinance https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7jzWHqnXtWLTDAxLWlfNllTRVk/view

New 2015 Updated Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (MWELO) needs to be integrated in Ojai Municipal Code, with City staff/Planning Commission trained on new standards. Existing Article 12. Landscaping Standards Sec. 10-2.1201. Purpose of article. (§ 3, Ord. 771, eff. February 13, 2004) contradicts the new standards.  This should be done soon, per Ojai City Council Action in October, 2016.

4.  City of Ojai General Plan- update going on now through the County – http://vc2040.org  Need to incorporate watershed management and storm water elements in General Plans. Copy of existing general plan for City of Ojai is here: http://ojaicity.org/document-center/

5.  Local and Ventura County Resources

Ocean Friendly Gardens (OFG) A Watershed Approach to Stormwater Mgmt. http://www.surfrider.org/programs/ocean-friendly-gardensGreen streets, Recycle wastewater, Restore natural waterways are topics covered in Surfrider film, “The Cycle Of Insanity” – https://vimeo.com/10328536

Existing curb cut in City of Ventura led by Ocean Friendly Gardens-Ventura

City of Ventura’s curb cut/bio-swale design detail is found here: 413 Residential Neighborhood Street Parkway Bioretention Facility, developed by the City’s Brad Starr <bstarr@ci.ventura.ca.us> and Paul Herzog, National Ocean Friendly Gardens Program Coordinator, (310) 430-9760, pherzog@surfrider.org

6.  Central Coast – Low Impact Development Center works with water agencies and municipalities to develop standards and building codes for green streets and stormwater capture. http://centralcoastlidi.org

7. State Cal Trans-2.2 Million grant received to do road improvements

CAL Trans Low Impact Development (LID) reference in Complete Streets planning, design and construction process:

http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/LandArch/16_la_design/guidance/ec_toolbox/lid/index.htm

Low Impact Development (LID) Guidance, OVERVIEW AND BACKGROUND

8.  State Water Resources Control Board MWELO– More emphasis put on increasing stormwater capture and retention using rain gardens, drywells, dry streambeds, bioswales, bio-retention, living soils, compost and mulch.

http://www.water.ca.gov/wateruseefficiency/landscapeordinance/

 

Low Impact Development Policy
Guidelines for Creating LID Policies:

https://www.epa.gov/green-infrastructure/policy-guides

CA LID Policy Review in 2008 Of LID Policies For The State:

http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water_issues/programs/low_impact_development/docs/ca_lid_policy_review.pdf

Resources From http://www.coastal.ca.gov

Their PDF has good links and info including the info copied below. The dates in the document put this at around 2008.

http://www.coastal.ca.gov/nps/lid-factsheet.pdf

Low Impact Development Center                    www.lowimpactdevelopment.org

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency           www.epa.gov/owow/nps/urban.html

Stormwater Manager’s Resource Center       www.stormwatercenter.net

National NEMO Network                                    www.nemonet.uconn.edu

LID Urban Design Tools                                    www.lid-stormwater.net

National Association of Home Builders          www.toolbase.org/index-toolbase.asp

California Stormwater Quality Association    www.cabmphandbooks.com

Local Codes Aren’t LID-friendly

Revise local codes & ordinances to support use of LID techniques. Check out the Center for Watershed Protection’s website for suggested guidelines (www.cwp.org/COW_worksheet.htm).  Note from OVGC – this site is a professional organization with membership required for full access.

Some communities that have found solutions

Hercules has modified stormwater management guidelines that fit LID principles, city codes that allow administrative approval for LID projects, and limited street lengths.

Contra Costa incorporated LID measures into their Standard Urban Stormwater Management Plan (SUSMP) for new development ( http://www.cccleanwater.org/construction/nd.php  ) .

Sacramento, likewise, is publishing their own design manual in Fall, 2006 that includes LID measures.

San Diego has new parking standards for intensive commercial zones that include smaller parking spaces and driveways, plus new guidelines requiring reduced imperviousness for parking spaces.

 Santa Monica encourages LID by requiring that all new developments and substantial remodels submit an “Urban Runoff Mitigation Plan”, and reduce projected runoff for the site by 20%. The city recommends LID technologies.

http://www.smgov.net/

http://www.qcode.us/codes/santamonica/

Searching by Urban Runoff Mitigation leads to code sections:

7.10.010, Findings 

The City Council finds and declares:

7.10.080, Additional best management practices requirements.

7.10.030 Definitions. 

7.10.050 Urban runoff reduction requirements for new development/re-development.

9.24.030 Minimum Requirements

City of Santa Barbara
Info: Last Updated: Jul 18, 2016

http://www.santabarbaraca.gov/gov/depts/parksrec/creeks/outreach/do/develop.asp

County of Los Angeles Department of Public Works – Low Impact Development Standards Manual February 2014 http://www.dpw.lacounty.gov/ldd/lib/fp/Hydrology/Low%20Impact%20Development%20Standards%20Manual.pdf

Green Infrastructure for Los Angeles: Addressing Urban Runoff and Water Supply Through Low Impact Development http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water_issues/programs/climate/docs/resources/la_green_infrastructure.pdf

Los Angeles MS4 Permit Low Impact Development (LID) Ordinances and Green Streets Policies http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/losangeles/water_issues/programs/stormwater/municipal/lid_and_greenst/index.shtml

City of Pasadena Planning & Community Development > Building & Safety  >  Low Impact Development (LID) good details and good links
http://cityofpasadena.net/Planning/LID/

County of San Diego Low Impact Development Literature Index 2007 http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/dplu/docs/LID-Literature-Index.pdf

Information for LID from Coastal Commission 2008 Workshops including one in Ventura
http://www.coastal.ca.gov/nps/lid_workshops.html

Link to West Placer Post Construction Stormwater Design Manual. This is done by a group of small cities in the Sierra Nevada. http://www.placer.ca.gov/lowimpactdevelopment

Low Impact Development Manual for Southern California: Technical Guidance and Site Planning Strategies – From the manuals Index:

Incorporating LID into the Planning Process ………………………….200

Incorporating LID into General Plans …………………………………….200

Possible Approaches to Incorporate LID into General Plans……..201

Addressing LID through Specific Plans……………………………………201

Addressing LID through Conditions of Approval ………………………202

LID and Municipal Codes and Ordinances ……………………………….203

LID and Municipal Codes ………………………………………………………203

New Ordinances to Facilitate LID…………………………………………..203

Including LID in Stormwater Ordinances………………………………..204

Removing Barriers to LID in Current Codes…………………………….

Link to the Manual – https://www.casqa.org/resources/lid/socal-lid-manual