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Climate Change

From UCLA’s Center for Climate Science

The Sierra Nevada Mtn range looms large in the lives of California’s 40 million residents. The food we grow and water we drink depends on the mountains and their effects on climate. That’s why researchers in UCLA’s Center for Climate Science spent the past three years projecting how climate change will affect the Sierra Nevada. On April 2, the final report was released.
The state’s climate is expected to change dramatically by the end of the century, presenting challenges to reduce carbon emissions and adapt to new climate realities.

“There is a lot of positive climate action in California to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Alex Hall, director of the climate center and a professor with UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. “On adaptation planning, the state has shown strong leadership. I’m really encouraged by the openness of officials across the state to examine climate change impacts and plan for them.”

The report synthesizes a research effort that produced five academic publications, including papers on temperature, snowpack during drought and runoff timing. Here are some of the most critical findings, based on what the researchers expect by the end of the century if carbon emissions are not reduced significantly:

On warming:

At middle elevations — 5,000 to 8,000 feet above sea level — temperatures could rise from 7 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit, in part because of the snow albedo feedback, in which melting snow reveals darker surfaces that absorb more heat, further amplifying warming.
In foothills and valleys, temperatures would increase between 5 and 7 degrees.

On snowpack, which serves as a natural reservoir for the state’s water supply:

More precipitation will fall as rain instead of snow, and snow will melt more rapidly.
On average, snowpack across the entire Sierra on April 1 would be 64 percent less than it was when measured in the years 1981–2000.

Recent UCLA article forecasts severe precipitation future for CA

Another Article published 5.21.18

According to UCLA-led research published today, building infrastructure to bolster local water resources isn’t just good for people and the environment — it also makes economic sense. https://www.ioes.ucla.edu/article/making-an-economic-case-for-local-water-in-l-a-county/

plants

Low Water Plant Lists

Incorporating native wildflowers, shrubs, and trees into any landscape promotes local biological diversity and provides shelter and food for a diversity of wildlife. Most natives require minimal irrigation, flourish without fertilizers, and are unlikely to become weedy.
Xeres Society

Online Resources

For the amazing California Native Plant Society plant list for the Ojai area, login to the Calscape plants data base for zip code 93023 then look for and save plants to your profile. I found 822 plants in the Ojai area code 93023 here:
Ojai Plant List by Plant Type

From City of Corona, see Landscape Guides (water-saving plant lists and sample garden design plans).

From City of San Jose, see garden designs and sustainable landscaping resources at Garden Designs and Demonstrations webpage.

POLLINATOR GARDEN RESOURCES

Butterfly Plant List from XERCES Society https://xerces.org/pollinator-conservation/plant-lists/pollinator-plants-california/

XERCES Society CA Native Bess Fact Sheet 
Native Bees Plant list from
SF GATE
Attracting Bees
According to Pollinator Partners, there are nearly 4,000 varieties of native bees in the United States. Of those, Las Pilitas Nursery calculates 1,000 are native to California, including 26 varieties of bumblebees. Since numerous varieties have very specialized pollination functions, generalities about bee flower preferences are helpful. Bees are drawn to blue, purple and yellow flowers, and are attracted by strong fragrances. They can see ultraviolet colors, as displayed by buttercups (Ranunculus acris) and black-eyed susans (Rudbeckia spp.). Since they stand, as well as hover, to feed, blossoms with an open throat, like beard-tongue (Penstemon spp.) and salvia (Salvia spp.), are nectar-source mainstays of a bee garden. Spring-blooming California lilacs (Ceanothus spp.) attract bees with their color range and sweet fragrances. Early-blooming manzanitas (Archtostaphylos spp.) and late-blooming goldenrod (Solidago californica) extend both ends of the garden season.

Butterflies
Butterflies favor scented flowers in shades of red, purple and yellow. From wild asters (Aster spp.) to sunflowers (Helianthus spp.) and milkweeds (Asclepias syrica), many butterfly species favor flat-topped flowers on which they can perch easily while they feed. Napa Valley Master Gardeners include California, or Canada, thistle (Cirsium arvense), ironweed (Vernonia novaboracensis), rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) and goldenrod among other reliable native butterfly attractors. Buckwheats (Erigonum) of all varieties serve as nectar and food sources for numerous butterfly varieties.

Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds are drawn to red flowers, native and cultivated. Trumpet vine (Campsis radicans) and honeysuckles (Locinera spp.) are hummingbird magnets. Bergamot (Monarda spp.) may be known commonly as bee balm, but it attracts hummingbirds as well. California fuchsia (Zauschneria californica) also possesses the deep-throated red flowers that hummingbirds love. Hummingbirds are drawn in spring to manzanita flowers. One native nursery describes the birds’ attraction to monkey flowers (Diplacus spp.) and California columbines (Aquilegia spp.) as aggressive and protective. Plant cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), penstemons and all varieties of native sage (Salvia spp.) to insure hummingbirds in your garden throughout the growing season.

FIRE RESISTANT PLANTS

HFH Plant List, Santa Barbara Fire Resistant Plant List
California Native Plant Society Fire Recovery Guidelines

CA NATIVE Plant Lists

El Nativo California Natives – Easy Medium Drought Tolerant Plant Guidebook
Link to Garden Ideas to Save Water from HouzzDrought Tolerant Guidebook from LA
Betsy Landis for CNPS-School Gardens Book secIIa,BL20110831
Nifty50_2009_illustrated
Attracting Pollinators with Native Plants Booklet attractingpollinators-1

TreePeople Native Plant List

Parkway Guidelines/Plant Lists

City of LA Parkway Guidelines/Plants

City of Corona Parkway Design/
City of West Hollywood Parkway Guidelines/Plants

City of Santa Barbara HW1 Coastal Corridor Parkway Guidelines

Water Wise Lawn Alternatives, City of Santa Barbara

Parkway Plant list from Weeding Wild Suburbia  

Gardening with Natives –  Design Plant Palettes, Layout and Ideas

Goleta Water Edible Garden

GROWING FOOD

CA Rare Fruit Growers-SB & Ventura Chapter
Water Conservation Tips – Vegetable Gardens 

TREES
Tree People Resources Page
Ojai Trees
Managing Your Turf During Drought
Turf Alternatives http://waterwisesb.org/asset.c/259
Your Lawn During Drought, UC AG & Natural Resources, Master Gardener Contra Costa County  http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/files/186273.pdf
Contra Costa County Drought Survival Guide for Lawns
https://lbre.stanford.edu/sem/sites/all/lbre-shared/files/docs_public/CCWD_DroughtSurvivalGuide_Lawns.pdf
Educational Resources for Watershed Education-Region 8 of CREEC
http://www.creec.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/CREEC-Community-Resources-list-Region-8-2017.pdf
Climate Change
<pre><a href=”https://youtu.be/ohNNsC9Q5a8″>Heat Island Effect explained</a>
Newsletters/Blogs to follow
WATER DEEPLY is designed to help you understand the complex web of environmental, social and economic issues related to water in California. https://www.newsdeeply.com/water and http://toxictaps.newsdeeply.com/
California Water Blog https://californiawaterblog.com/
Association of CA Water Agencies https://www.acwa.com/news_document_type/newsletters/
Sustainable Conservation http://suscon.org/
Resources from UC CA Master Gardeners:  UC  Cooperative Extension http://ciwr.ucanr.edu/california_drought_expertise/droughttips/
33 Ways to Save Water in Your Home Garden
California Institute for Water Resources
California Water Districts & Associations
NEW! Coastal California Rain Gardens
NEW! Keeping Landscape Plantings Alive under Drought or Water Restrictions
Gardening Basics: How do I practice sustainable gardening?
Landscape Water Conservation Resources Map
Lawn Watering Guide for California
Managing Turfgrass During Drought
Managing Water, Sustainably
Questions & Answers About Water Conservation and Drought in the Landscape
Water Conservation Tips for Home Lawn and Garden
Below are links to local and State of California Water Use Efficiency mandates and changes, along with some water wise landscaping websites to make the most of the water we do have.
LOCAL Resources
Casitas Water Drought Declaration and Water Waste Prohibitions
City of Ojai Drought Information and Resources
Ventura County Seasonal Rainfall Map
County of Santa Barbara WaterWise Landscaping
City of Santa Barbara Drought and Water Conservation Information
STATE OF CA – WATER USE EFFICIENCY
California Model Water Use Efficiency Ordinance (MWELO)
WUCOLS plant database of water requirements by region in CA
U.C. AG & Natural Resources-Master Gardeners
Capture the Rain and Let it Flow
Plant list for Rain Gardens
Water Conservations Tips for the Home Lawn & Garden
Sustainable Landscaping In California
GARDENS & PLACES TO VISIT
Meiners Oaks Elementary School -Watershed Friendly Garden
Cluff Vista Park in Ojai- Native Garden designed by Tom Bostrom
Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens in Santa Barbara
Firescape Gardens at Stanwood Dr. and Mission Ridge Rd. in Santa Barbara
Ventura Botanical Gardens in Ventura
Seaside Gardens in Carpenteria
Lotus Land http://www.lotusland.org/ in Montecito
Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden  in Claremont
Grow Natives Nursery near UCLA in Veterans Garden
Descanso Gardens in La Cañada Flintridge
South Coast Botanic Garden in Palos Verdes Peninsula
San Luis Obispo Botanic Gardens in San Luis Obispo
The LA Arboretum in Arcadia
The Huntington Gardens in San Marino
Arlington Garden in South Pasadena
Point Vicente Interpetive Center in Palos Verde
REMOVING YOUR LAWN
There are several different ways to remove your lawn, some take longer than other. I like to  encourages homeowners to consider methods that reduce waste generation and chemical use, and recycle turf  back into your soil when possible.
UCCE Master Gardeners of Sacramento County
California Native Plant Society
Master Gardeners of Santa Clara County
Sonoma County Master Gardeners
Ocean Friendly Gardens
Stop Waste
Capturing Rainwater
Rain garden design and placement require planning (not too close to the foundation of buildings) and sizing (big enough to capture one inch of rain off of a nearby roof), along with the ability to drain into and percolate water into soil (based on soil texture and structure i.e. percentage of sand, silt and clay ).  Rain gardens also need to be designed with spillways for very large rain event, so extreme amounts of rainwater can “spill out” and into the storm drains.  And don’t forget the plants, which have to like being wet in the rainy season and dry in the summer.  More info below:
San Luis Obispo Guide to LID
Iowa Rain Garden Design and Installation Manual
Youtube Videos Calculating Runoff https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMmNY7SimV8
Plants for Rain Gardens
LID Plant Guidance for Bio Retention
UC CAL Extension  SEA GRANT – Rain Gardens
G3-Green Gardens Group Design Manuals
Drought Tolerant Handbook from LA
San Diego Sustainable Landscape Guidelines
Beverly Hills Garden Handbook
Plant Database from SO CAL Nurseries/Growers
Where to get native plants in SO CALIFORNIA
Tree of Life Nursery
El Nativo Growers
El Nativo -What CA Natives are Easy to GROW?
Matilija Nursery in Moorpark
Native Sons
The Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley
Monrovia Plant Catalog
Dave’s Garden Plant Files
San Marcos Growers in Sant Barbara
USDA Plant Finder
http://findnativeplants.com/pacific/california-native-plants/
Favorite Websites on WaterWise Plants:
WUCOLS WUCOLS plant database water requirements by region in CA
CALIFORNIA FRIENDLY LANDSCAPE WEBSITE from Met Water District in LA
Gardening Success with Ca Native Plants from Master Gardeners of Sonoma County
LA County Green Building Program | DRP
CA Native Plant Society of LA and Santa Monica Mountains- List of Resources
Search by zip code http://www.mynativeplants.com/site
Nifty Fifty list of plants and other info from San Diego County Water Authority
Landscape Plants for California Gardens by Bob Perry download Ch 1-3
UC DAvis Arboretum All Stars
Sunset Waterwise Gardening
Eguide to a Watersmart Lifestyle (San Diego County Water Authority)
POLLINATOR GARDEN RESOURCES
Pollinator Plants for Southern California: coastal and foothills
Native Bees Plant list
FIRE RESISTANT PLANTS
HFH Plant List, Santa Barbara Fire Resistant Plant List
Compost/Mulch/Vermicompost
Worms
CA NATIVE plants Lists:
California Natives_ Easy Medium Difficult to Grow
DroughtTolerantPlantGuidebook
CNPS_SchoolGardensBooksecIIa,BL20110831
Nifty50_2009_illustrated
attractingpollinators-1
TreePeople Native Plant List
Parkway Guidelines/Plant Lists
City of LA Parkway Guidelines/Plants
City of West Hollywood Parkway Guidelines/Plants
City of Corona Parkway Design
City of Santa Barbara HW1 Coastal Corridor Parkway Guidelines
Water Wise Lawn Alternatives, City of Santa Barbara
Parkway Plant list from Weeding Wild Suburbia
Gardening with Natives –  Design Plant Palettes, Layout and Ideas
City of San Jose
Goleta Water Edible Garden
Native Plant Planting Instructions from Irvine Water District
GROWING FOOD
CA Rare Fruit Growers-SB & Ventura Chapter
Water Conservation Tips – Vegetable Gardens
TREES
Tree People Resources Page
Ojai Trees
OPEN SPACE AND CONSERVATION
Ojai Valley Land Conservancy
Ventura Land Trust
VENTURE RIVER WATERSHED WATCH
Friends of the Ventura River
Ventura River Watershed Council
Santa Barbara Channel Keeper
Ventura County Ocean Friendly Gardens
Surfrider Foundation
Managing Your Turf During Drought
Turf Alternatives http://waterwisesb.org/asset.c/259
Your Lawn During Drought, UC AG & Natural Resources, Master Gardener Contra Costa County  http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/files/186273.pdf
Contra Costa County Drought Survival Guide for Lawns
https://lbre.stanford.edu/sem/sites/all/lbre-shared/files/docs_public/CCWD_DroughtSurvivalGuide_Lawns.pdf
Educational Resources for Watershed Education-Region 8 of CREEC
http://www.creec.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/CREEC-Community-Resources-list-Region-8-2017.pdf
Climate Change
Heat Island Effect explained
UC  Cooperative Extension
http://ciwr.ucanr.edu/california_drought_expertise/droughttips/
Los Padres National Forest Thomas Fire Burn Area Emergency (FBAE) Response Team Reportshttps://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/lpnf/home/?cid=fseprd570093

BOOKS:
Coachella Valley plant book available for purchase at $10 https://dwa.org/conservation/efficient-landscaping/lush-efficient

Uncategorized

Large storm to bring lots of rain to VC

3/20/18 at 10:20AM Large storm predicted from SLO down to LA.

Weather Summary

A major Atmospheric River event expected to impact Ventura County beginning Tuesday, March 20, 2018 afternoon through Thursday, March 22, 2018 evening. Rain should start spreading over Ventura County this afternoon. Rainfall is expected to range from 2 to 5 inches along the coast with 4 to 8 inches for foothill areas. Some mountain areas may see over 10 inches. Rainfall totals fall off quickly toward the east with the highest totals along Western Ventura County and along Nordhoff Ridge to Santa Paula Creek. The latest model runs are showing the highest totals occurring in Santa Barbara County. Models are also indicating up to 36 hours of moderate to heavy rain with intensities 0.3 to 0.8 in/hr with areas with 1.0 in/hr possible. The highest intensities should occur late Wednesday March 21, 2018 through Thursday, March 22, 2018 morning. Latest models lowered rainfall totals in coastal areas but increased totals for the foothills around Ojai. Clearing is expected on Thursday, March 222, 2018 evening with drier weather expected over the weekend with a possible light rain event mid to late next week.

Continue reading “Large storm to bring lots of rain to VC”

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Rainfall Updates

Annual Rainfall Totals for Ojai for last 6 years (Ojai 
annual average rainfall of 21.32")
   2018   11.42" (as of May 22, 2018)
   2017   27.72"
   2016   10.13"
   2015   11.86"
   2014   9.16"
   2013   9.07" 
data from VC Watershed Protection District Rainfall Report

Rainfall totals by Month for Ojai

Regional Rainfall Data

Precip for March 2018 & for the current Water Year (October 1,2017-March 31,2018) for select locations in San Luis, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.  Good March, but still below normal for the water year.

Links to Rainfall Data

Links to NOAA Rainfall Forecasts

Radar Products

  • Sulphur Mountain (Ojai) Doppler

  • Rainfall estimates – 1hr, storm total

Following these sites:

Weather Underground

Thomas Fire Burn Area

https://www.wunderground.com/forecast/us/ca/ojai/KCAOJAI29

Daniel Swain at Weather West.com http://weatherwest.com/archives/6203
Pineapple Express deluge in Southern California; high risk of Thomas Fire flash floods & mudslides
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March 19, 2018 • 302 Comments

Weather West News

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Water in the Local NEWS

Ventura River Watershed Council
Next meeting Thursday November 3rd 2016, from 9:00 am to 11:30 am  discussion of the Draft Ojai Basin Alternative Groundwater Sustainability Plan, and an update on the Ventrua River instream flow requirement. The Bell Arts Factory  community room 432 N. Ventura Ave, Ventura, CA 93001.
At July 7th, 2016  meeting Ventura River Flow Requirements were discussed with
Kevin DeLanos, State Water Resources Control Board Division of Water Rights, Instream Flow Unit
Kevin spoke about Governor Brown’s California Water Action Plan directive for the
State Water Board and the California Department of Fish and
Wildlife to work together to establish a flow requirement to
protect endangered salmonids while balancing the other
beneficial uses of water.
___________________________________________________________________________

Rainfall Data- yes, we  had a little rain the end of October, 2016—enough to clean off the dusty leaves, .74 inches.

screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-12-14-31-pm

 

 

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Rainscape Designs provide a lush landscape – even in the drought!

Rainscape Design captures rainwater and survives the drought!

AFTER:  It Works! The berms (high spots) and swales (low spots ) direct rainwater from the roof, gutters and downspouts into basins that slow, sink and spread rainwater into the landscape. The rainwater doesn’t runoff but is collected and stored in mulched basins.  This landscape is “Ocean Friendly” and “River Friendly” and even “Watershed Friendly”—  it captures and stores rainwater and reduces runoff into our rivers, creeks and the ocean.

Rainscape Design captures rainwater!

BEFORE:  The grass has gotta go!  In Ojai, one square foot of turf requires about 51 inches of water a year (more in the summer, less in the winter).  It also needs mowing, edging, blowing, irrigation maintenance, fertilizer etc.  It is also flat and water runs off.  It also attract gophers.img_4734